How To Grow Radish Microgreens At Home

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Learn all about how to grow radish microgreens in your own home.  These tender microgreens have a distinct peppery flavor and are a nutrient powerhouse that can easily be grown year-round indoors.  Radish microgreens are baby radish plants that are ready to harvest just ten days after planting and require minimal effort to grow.  Growing your own radish microgreens is a great way to get some nutrition from one of the planet’s healthiest superfoods without having to depend on the grocery store.

microgreens growing on a plant rack

I have been growing microgreens and selling them to our local grocery stores every week for over two years now.  We grow sunflower, pea, radish and broccoli microgreens.  Our family enjoys eating them in soups, on our eggs, in wraps, on burgers, and in salads, or just as a healthy snack all by themselves.

What Are Radish Microgreens?

Radish microgreens are young radish plants with rosy stems and small dark green leaves that are grown indoors and harvested within a week or two of planting.  Unlike sprouts, microgreens are grown on soil and under lights giving them high levels of chlorophyll & plant pigment.   Radish microgreens are usually harvested about 9-10 days after germination.  The health benefits of radish microgreens are unbelievable, considering their tiny size. They can contain up to 40 times the levels of essential nutrients by weight compared to mature radish!

Why You Should Eat Radish Microgreens?

Radish microgreens are not only delicious, they are more than 40x higher in nutritional value than other adult vegetables, so you don’t have to eat very many of them to reap lots of nutritional value.

My favorite part about microgreens is how fast and easy they are to grow.  Because they are grown indoors, you can easily have a continual supply of fresh greens in your own home year round with minimal effort. 

What Do Radish Microgreens Taste Like?

Radish microgreens have a fresh flavor and taste similar to adult radish, they are spicy with a crunchy texture.  They are so good on top of a steak, and are a great addition to a bowl of soup, or on an egg sandwich for breakfast.

radish microgreens on soup

What Are The Major Health Benefits of Radish Microgreens?

These little greens are packed with beneficial nutrients.  The potential health benefits of radish microgreens are they:

  • Boost your immune system
  • Increase energy levels
  • Improve cardiovascular health
  • Help lower bad cholesterol
  • Contain chlorophyll
  • Plant-based protein
  • Have anti-inflammatory properties
  • Improve digestion
  • High in vitamin A, B, C, E & K
  • Great source of copper
  • Lower risk of premature aging by protecting cells from free radicals which can damage DNA
  • Protect against alzheimers

They are also known for being high in

  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphorus
  • Potassium
  • Protein
  • Zinc
  • Essential amino acids 
  • Dietary fiber

Disclaimer: This website does not provide medical or nutritional advice. The information and material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. No material on this site is a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek your physicians’ or qualified nutritionists’ advice before undertaking a new healthcare regimen or using any information you have read on this website to treat or prevent any condition.

How To Grow Radish Microgreens (A Complete Guide)

To grow radish microgreens you only need some seeds, a growing medium, a microgreen grow tray, water, and plenty of light.   

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Growing Supplies

What Are The Best Radish Seeds For Microgreens?

My favorite radish microgreen seeds to grow are the China rose radish microgreen seeds from True Leaf Market.  They are fresh, zesty and spicy and have beautiful pink stems that add a rosy color to any dish.

You don’t want to order cheap seed for growing microgreens because germination rates won’t be as high and they are sometimes treated with pesticides.  True Leaf Market is the best and most reliable supplier I have found.

Growing Medium

There are many different growing medium options on the market today for growing radish microgreens.  The very best medium that will give you the highest and most consistent yield is just regular old potting soil.  God designed plants to grow in soil, and that is still where they seem to grow best.  It doesn’t really matter what kind of potting soil you use because the plants are harvested so young that they are not actually getting any nutritional value from the potting soil or fertilizer that might be in it.  All the nutrition and energy in the radish microgreens come from within the seeds themselves, which is incredible!  I suggest that you buy some organic potting soil from your local hardware store or order some from Amazon.  I have also grown microgreens on coconut coir and been very successful, but the soil is the least expensive and works very well.  Whatever growing medium you choose, I know you will grow a bountiful harvest.

lady adding soil to microgreen trays

Microgreen Seed Trays

I highly suggest that you invest in some heavy duty shallow microgreen growing trays from True Leaf Market. I have grown microgreens constantly in these trays for the last two years, and they have held up really well.  For each tray of greens you want to grow, you will need a shallow tray without drainage holes, and a shallow microgreen tray with drainage holes.  You will nest the planting tray with holes inside the second tray without holes so they will be easy to water without making a mess.

It’s important to use these shallow trays because it allows good airflow to the plants as they are growing which reduces the chances of mold growth.  They are also much easier to harvest in these shallow trays.  

Light

You don’t need a special grow light for growing microgreens.  A regular LED shop light will work just fine.  You can also grow them in a sunny window if you’re not growing that many and you’re getting at least 12 hours of daylight.  However, if you’re interested in having a steady supply of microgreens year-round, then I suggest investing in my DIY indoor seed starting setup.  This is what I use to grow all of my microgreens and to start all my vegetable and flower seeds in the spring. 

Steps for Growing Radish Microgreens

  1. Place the microgreen tray with drainage holes inside the tray without drainage holes.
  2. Add soil to the microgreen tray until your soil line is to the top of the tray.  I use about 14 cups of soil per tray.  Use another tray to press the soil surface down, which will help them to grow evenly.
  3. Measure 32 grams (less than ¼ cup) of radish seeds into a small container
  4. Sprinkle the seed evenly over the top of the soil in the tray.
  5. Water evenly.  Use just enough water to wet them down, do not drown them.  I use the spray nozzle on my sink faucet.  
  6. Place another empty growing tray on top of the seeded tray and place a 15 lb. weight on it.  I use a 5 gallon bucket, but a paving stone works well also. This is the germination phase which usually takes about 2-3 days.  You do not need to water them or do anything with them while they are sitting under the weighted tray in germination.
  7. The next step is to take the weighted tray off the top and sprinkle the seeds with water.  Again, I just use the spray function on the faucet in my sink.
  8. Place them under the LED grow lights on your plant rack.  Leave the lights on during the day, and turn them off at night.  It’s best if they get 12-16 hours of daylight per day.  If you need them to grow faster you can leave the lights on 24 hours a day, but typically I shut them off at night.
  9. Water once per day by gently lifting the top tray enough that you can pour about a quart of water into the bottom tray.  This is called bottom watering.
  10. On day 9 or 10, the radish shoots will be ready to harvest.  To harvest, grab a handful of greens with one hand, and cut them off close to the soil with a sharp knife in your other hand.  I do not recommend cutting them with scissors as it can crimp the stem of the greens which will shorten their shelf life.  It’s also best to stop watering the greens 12 hours before harvesting, so they will be dry and last longer.
  11. You can dispose of the leftover soil and roots in your compost pile.  It will make really good compost.  
  12. Be sure to clean and sanitize the trays to prepare them for their next use.  You can sanitize the trays by spraying them with diluted food-grade hydrogen peroxide.
  13. radish microgreens will maintain their crisp texture in the refrigerator for 2-4 weeks if kept in an airtight container.  The smaller the container the better, as the extra air in the container can tend to dry them out.
  14. Use as the base of any salad, in wraps, on egg dishes, or enjoy their pop of color on top of soup or anywhere you can add them to a meal.  Your body will thank you for the extra nutrition and boost to your immune system, especially in the winter.

Radish Microgreen FAQs

How Do You Eat Radish Microgreens?

  • 1.  Eat them plain as a snack
  • 2.  Anytime you make a salad, add some in with the lettuce
  • 3.  Replace lettuce with microgreens in any sandwich, burrito, wrap, burger or taco
  • 4.  Put them on top of eggs or steak
  • 5.  Garnish your bowls of soup, or noodles with microgreens
  • 6.  Add them to smoothies

What is the best way to water radish microgreen trays?

Radish microgreens grow best if they are watered from the bottom.  They will soak up the water they need and you won’t have any problems with mold or fungus like you might have if you top water them.  It’s important not to over water them.  I usually give them about a quart of water per day.

How long does it take to grow radish microgreens?

It takes about 7-10 days to grow radish microgreens from seeding until harvest.

How long does it take to harvest radish microgreens?

I can usually harvest a 10” x 20” tray of microgreens in less than 3 minutes.

How do you know when radish microgreens are ready to harvest?

Microgreens are typically harvested before the first true leaves (or the second set of tiny leaves) begin to appear.

Do radish microgreens regrow after harvest?

No, they have used up all the energy in their seed, and will not regrow after harvest.

What is the best growing medium for radish microgreens?

The best growing medium for radish microgreen is soil.  You can grow radish microgreens coconut coir or growing mats, but I have found that the simplest, easiest and least expensive way to grow microgreens of any kind is on soil.

What does it cost to grow radish microgreens?

It depends on what you get for soil of course, but the seeds cost about $0.58 per tray, and the soil costs about $0.65 per tray, so your total cost per tray is approximately $1.23.  That is not including the initial investment of your microgreen trays and plant rack setup.

How many microgreens do you harvest off of each tray?

I usually get about 10-12 oz. of radish microgreens from each tray.

packaging radish microgreens

What is the retail value of microgreens?  

Microgreens are usually priced by the ounce for retail.  Depending on the variety, they are usually priced at a minimum of $2.00 per oz.  This will vary based on market location, variety of microgreens and type of packaging, etc.

Do radish microgreens need blackout?

No, radish microgreens do not need to spend time in a blackout phase.

Some microgreen growers like to leave their microgreens in “blackout” for a day after they come out of the germination phase.  This just means that they take the weight off of the trays, and leave them covered with another tray so the microgreens are in the dark.  This encourages them to stretch and grow taller.  I have found that putting them in blackout increases the chance for mold growth on your greens, so I do not recommend putting them in blackout.

Are radish microgreens hard to grow?

No, radish microgreens are not hard to grow.  They are one of the easiest microgreens to grow just like mature radishes are really easy seeds to grow out in the garden.

Are radish microgreens good for you?

Yes, radish microgreens are known for being one of the planet’s healthiest superfoods with up to 40X higher nutrients than regular radish.  They are rich in antioxidants and high in vitamins, especially vitamin C.  They are packed with essential minerals, along with their sweet, spicy flavor.

Are microgreens and sprouts the same?

No, microgreens and sprouts are different.  Sprouts are grown by rinsing seeds in water twice a day and just letting the seeds “sprout”.  They are harvested 3-4 days after first starting to germinate.  Microgreens are grown on soil and under lights and are harvested at the small seedling stage, about 7-12 days after germination.  Microgreens are actually baby plants that have all the nutrients and energy that is found in the seed, along with the chlorophyll and plant pigment that comes from being grown under lights.  Also, when you eat sprouts, you are eating the seed and the sprout, but with microgreens you cut the seed part off and leave it with the roots in the soil.

Can you set up automatic watering for radish microgreens?

Yes!  There’s a little bit more involved with doing this, but if you’re going to be gone on vacation, and still want to have fresh radish microgreens available when you return, you can set up automatic watering for your greens.  The best way to do it is to get a 2” deep 10” x 20” tray and set another flexible tray upside down in the first tray.  Lay a piece of knit or super stretchy type fabric over the top of the upside down tray and tuck the sides of the fabric down into the bottom tray.  This will act as a wick for the water in the tray.  Then spread your soil or coconut coir on the fabric and plant your seeds.  Water lightly with a spray bottle and cover with a plastic bag to keep them moist while they germinate.  Once they start to sprout, remove the plastic, put them under lights.  Fill the bottom tray with water, making sure that the fabric wick can reach the water on at least two sides of the tray.  They should stay moist and grow without you having to add water.  You can put your lights on a timer, and with this automatic watering system you can grow microgreens even when you’re gone.  Please note:  this method works best for tiny seeds like broccoli and radish.  I wouldn’t recommend it for sunflower and pea shoot microgreens.

Microgreen Growing Tips

Don’t Overwater

The #1 tip for growing successful microgreens is not to over water them.  Over time you will get a feel for about how much water to give them based on the growing medium you choose, and the humidity and temperature of your growing environment. I usually give them about a quart of water per day. 

What kind of environment is best for growing radish microgreens?

The ideal environment is one with low humidity and cool growing temperatures of around 68 to 72 degrees.  A lot of professional microgreen growers have dehumidifiers and other special equipment to regulate the environment in their growing area.  I do not get too technical on the specifics of my growing environment, because I am growing my microgreens in my basement and I only have so many options for controlling the humidity etc..  They seem to grow just fine and be fairly adaptable.

Lighting

I use two LED lights per rack because I have it set up that way for starting my vegetable seeds, but you only really need one LED light for microgreens.  It also doesn’t matter if the lights are several inches away from the plants because you actually want microgreens to stretch and grow.  It doesn’t matter if they start to get “leggy”, which is something you want to avoid with vegetable seedlings you are growing for the garden.

Plan A Regular Seeding Day and Harvest Day    

In order to have a continual supply of microgreens always available to eat, I suggest that you have a consistent schedule for seeding and harvest.  I like to soak my seeds on a Monday evening, seed my microgreens on Tuesday morning and harvest the following Thursday (9 days later).  You can adjust this based on your exact growing environment, but this will give you an idea of how to set up your schedule.  It takes me about 15 minutes to seed 10 trays of greens for the week, and about an hour to harvest and package them for the grocery store.  If you’re growing them for home use, you can always just set a tray of mature microgreens on your counter, and harvest them right as you are ready to eat them.  Living superfood at it’s finest!

And that’s it!  Growing microgreens is a very simple and easy process, and it is very rewarding!  With just a small investment in a seed starting setup and some trays, you can be growing and enjoying these nutritious superfoods all year long!

Learn More About The Other Types Of Microgreens We Grow

To learn more about the other microgreens we grow, click here.

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how to grow radish microgreens

How To Grow Radish Microgreens

radish microgreens

These tender microgreens have a distinct peppery flavor and are a nutrient powerhouse that can easily be grown year-round indoors.  Radish microgreens are baby radish plants that are ready to harvest just ten days after planting and require minimal effort to grow.  Growing your own radish microgreens is a great way to get some nutrition from one of the planet’s healthiest superfoods without having to depend on the grocery store.

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 32 grams (about 1/4 cup) of broccoli microgreen seeds
  • 1 microgreen tray without drainage holes
  • 1 microgreen tray with drainage holes
  • 14 cups potting soil
  • Water

Instructions

  1. Place the microgreen tray with drainage holes inside the tray without drainage holes.
  2. Add soil to the microgreen tray until your soil line is to the top of the tray.  I use about 14 cups of soil per tray.  Use another tray to press the soil surface down, which will help them to grow evenly.
  3. Measure 32 grams (less than ¼ cup) of radish seeds into a small container
  4. Sprinkle the seed evenly over the top of the soil in the tray.
  5. Water evenly.  Use just enough water to wet them down, do not drown them.  I use the spray nozzle on my sink faucet.  
  6. Place another empty growing tray on top of the seeded tray and place a 15 lb. weight on it.  I use a 5 gallon bucket, but a paving stone works well also. This is the germination phase which usually takes about 2-3 days.  You do not need to water them or do anything with them while they are sitting under the weighted tray in germination.
  7. The next step is to take the weighted tray off the top and sprinkle the seeds with water.  Again, I just use the spray function on the faucet in my sink.
  8. Place them under the LED grow lights on your plant rack.  Leave the lights on during the day, and turn them off at night.  It’s best if they get 12-16 hours of daylight per day.  If you need them to grow faster you can leave the lights on 24 hours a day, but typically I shut them off at night.
  9. Water once per day by gently lifting the top tray enough that you can pour about a quart of water into the bottom tray.  This is called bottom watering.
  10. On day 9 or 10, the radish shoots will be ready to harvest.  To harvest, grab a handful of greens with one hand, and cut them off close to the soil with a sharp knife in your other hand.  I do not recommend cutting them with scissors as it can crimp the stem of the greens which will shorten their shelf life.  It’s also best to stop watering the greens 12 hours before harvesting, so they will be dry and last longer.
  11. You can dispose of the leftover soil and roots in your compost pile.  It will make really good compost.  
  12. Be sure to clean and sanitize the trays to prepare them for their next use.  You can sanitize the trays by spraying them with diluted food-grade hydrogen peroxide.
  13. radish microgreens will maintain their crisp texture in the refrigerator for 2-4 weeks if kept in an airtight container.  The smaller the container the better, as the extra air in the container can tend to dry them out.
  14. Use as the base of any salad, in wraps, on egg dishes, or enjoy their pop of color on top of soup or anywhere you can add them to a meal.  Your body will thank you for the extra nutrition and boost to your immune system, especially in the winter.

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